Effects of divorce on children’s health
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Effects of divorce on children’s health

| Nov 21, 2019 | Divorce

Marriage is no longer a lifelong commitment as it used to be if the current divorce rates are anything to go by. While divorce is generally considered a normal settlement between two consenting adults, the effects of divorce can be devastating to both couples and children involved.

Notably, kids of divorced parents may face numerous challenges, which may affect their well-being if proper measures are not put in place. Here are some of the possible health problems.

Anxiety and depression

Children are more likely to suffer from stress, anxiety and depression. This is particularly true among young kids who are heavily dependent on both parents. Without proper counseling, they may develop negative thoughts about themselves, their surroundings or family members.

Increased risk of sickness

Kids brought up in broken families are more susceptible to various diseases and chronic conditions. This can stem from factors such as depression and lack of sleep. Moreover, they are more likely to indulge in substance abuse, which further increases the risk of developing chronic conditions such as cancer of the esophagus, lungs and other related diseases.

Emotional and behavioral problems

Emotional, social and behavioral problems are also common among children of divorced parents. Kids from these families tend to experience emotional distress, ranging from sadness to loneliness. As a result, they may choose to isolate themselves from their peers and family members.

If left unattended, these problems could become severe, leading to intergenerational concerns. For instance, they may have trouble holding down a job or even interacting with their supervisors and colleagues at work.

Psychological instability

The emotional impact of divorce on children is hard to ignore. Children from separated families are usually confused, scared and frustrated. They may struggle to understand why the dissolution happened, or even blame themselves for the divorce. In the long run, this may lead to poor academic performance and higher dropout rates.